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If you require advice about our service, please call 01634 333999 (Mon-Thurs 8am-6pm, Fri 8am-4pm) or 01634 334605 (Mon-thurs 6-6.30pm, Fri 4-6.30pm)

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Achilles tendinitis

Is when the tendon that connects the back of your leg to your heel becomes swollen and painful near the bottom of the foot. This tendon is called the Achilles tendon. It is used for walking, running, and jumping. Although the Achilles tendon can withstand great stresses from running and jumping, it is also prone to tendinitis, a condition associated with overuse and degeneration.

There are two types:

In noninsertional Achilles tendinitis, fibres in the middle portion of the tendon have begun to break down with tiny tears (degenerate), swell, and thicken. It more commonly affects younger, active people.

Insertional Achilles Tendinitis

Insertional Achilles tendinitis involves the lower portion of the heel, where the tendon attaches (inserts) to the heel bone. Tendinitis that affects the insertion of the tendon can occur at any time, even in patients who are not active.

Causes:

  • Sudden increase in the amount or intensity of exercise activity—for example, increasing the distance you run every day by a few miles without giving your body a chance to adjust to the new distance
  • Tight calf muscles—Having tight calf muscles and suddenly starting an aggressive exercise program can put extra stress on the Achilles tendon
  • Bone spur—Extra bone growth where the Achilles tendon attaches to the heel bone can rub against the tendon and cause pain

What happens at consultation?

You would first receive a comprehensive MSK physiotherapy examination including a subjective history including your past medical history and current medication.

What treatments would I expect?

Treatments include manual therapy, acupuncture, taping and exercises. On assessment if there is an indication for the need for orthotics you may be referred to podiatry to help with your symptoms.